stethoscopelife asked:

Hii! Im a medblr too I guess but Im still at the beginning of the course. I was wondering if you've always been good with surgical procedures and anatomy from the start. I am very much interested in trying a surgical specialty but I dont stand out in anatomy and am a tad bit clumsy. Ive never had any surgical classes though. How did you know you could do it?

I’ve always been really interested in surgery and I am a pretty clumsy person too! I think that once you have a few surgeries under your belt and learn the ropes things start to become more like second nature to you and you begin to calm your nerves and relax hence no clumsiness. 

Prior to my Anatomy & Physiology classes I took Intro to Human Bio, Human Bio and Advanced Human Bio so both of my A&P classes were pretty easy by that point because I had already had a great understanding of the human body and just built upon my knowledge.

The only reason I have “Surgical Classes” (classwork/lectures/clinical/labs) is because I’m getting my degree in Surgical Technology and it’s a large part of the required knowledge and skills I need to be successful. I’m not quite sure what you’re studying in school but you could always call your local hospital and ask to shadow a Doctor/Nurse/Surg-Tech in the OR and see if you could handle it or if it is something that you would really be interested in pursuing!

If you want it badly enough you will figure out a way regardless of any situation to be successful in school and have a great career in the OR!

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Good Luck!! :)

Anonymous asked:

Hi! So like you, I love surgery and am so interested in the surgical field, mainly trauma surgery but all and any type of surgery holds my interest. My goal is to become a PA but after reading about your career choice, I'm curious. Do you know of any surgical PA's that first assist? And why choose your career choice over a PA? Thanks!

orqueen answered:

Hello, Anon!
 
I’ve answered this question before, which I will copy and paste to the bottom of this post. 
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jessmeister77:

If i may interject , i was looking into being an ortho PA because i met really awesome ortho PA’s who first assist while i was scrubbed in (ortho is one of my specialties) i dont know if it’s JUST ortho PA’s who can do this but that’s what he told me.

I know of a couple Ortho PA’s who scrub in with their Surgeon’s but most of the time they only help interchange instruments with arthroscopies and positioning (from what I’ve seen)! But I know every state and hospital are different in their practices! But oddly enough, it is the Ortho specialty where I have worked with PA’s in surgery! No other specialty has that happened! 

Plus there are a lot of old school surgeons that want their PA in surgery with them but a lot of the newer age surgeons are adapting to the PA in the office taking new patients while having another PA or FA in surgery with them! All about preference and how the payroll comes out I guess.. But that’s what I’ve experienced in Ohio! I know I’ve been told in California they only let RN’s FA! 

Anonymous asked:

Hi! So like you, I love surgery and am so interested in the surgical field, mainly trauma surgery but all and any type of surgery holds my interest. My goal is to become a PA but after reading about your career choice, I'm curious. Do you know of any surgical PA's that first assist? And why choose your career choice over a PA? Thanks!

Hello, Anon!
 
I’ve answered this question before, which I will copy and paste to the bottom of this post. 
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my-disenchanted-lullaby asked:

I'm a new follow, and am intrigued by your choices in majors. When I go back to the University of Missouri - Columbia in August, I will be starting my junior year as a Biological Sciences major. I have always been interested in medicine and surgery, but I'm not sure medical school is an option for me at this time. I just wanted to ask if you have any advice on possible graduate school options that could get me involved! Thanks for your time :)

I just did a quick search on “Medical Masters Programs”

Here is what Stanford offers:

Biomedical Informatics: Biomedical Informatics (BMI) advances scientific inquiry and clinical decision-making through the application of computer science, statistics and other quantitative disciplines to today’s growing volume of biomedical data.

Epidemiology: Epidemiology studies the distribution and determinants of diseases across different populations to improve human health. The MS program is offered by the Department of Health Research and Policy.

Health Services Research: Health services research applies principles of outcomes research and cost-effectiveness to health policy in the public and private sectors. The MS program is offered by the Department of Health Research and Policy.

Masters of Human Genetics & Genetic Counseling: Human genetics and genetic counseling trains students to understand molecular and clinical variations in the human genome and to translate their findings to health-care professionals, patients and their families.

Masters of Medicine: The master’s of science in medicine program provides a foundation in clinical medicine to Stanford PhD candidates interested in pursuing translational research.

Besides these options offered at this particular school, you could always do a Physician Assistant Masters or a First Assistant Masters like I am. It’s all about what you want to do and where your main interests are. You are already ahead of the game by looking into your options! :) Remember, it’s never “too soon” to start researching possible graduate school options and admission teams love to help ambitious students excited about their future! 

Good luck!! I’m always here if you need any help!

ghostnineone asked:

Have you considered PA school? It's shorter than med school and you will graduate with a masters. Depending on where you live you will most likely be able to first assist, plus you will also have many of the same responsibilities as a physician and be able to do more outside the OR if that's what you'd like :) (and you can even switch your focus to another field if you choose)

I’ve actually looked into this option and have spoken with many Surgeons about this and their opinion was the following…

*The Physician Assistant works the office/clinic while the Surgeon is in surgery so the office is always taking patients. And the First Assistant is working with the Surgeon strictly in surgery.*

Now, I know this isn’t the case everywhere but I do know that this is the philosophy that many are pushing. They see it as more efficient and cost effective. I personally like my patients sedated. I don’t want to deal with the junk that comes with being a Physician Assistant. I just want to do surgery and that’s it.

Scrub in, assist, scrub out, repeat. Boom. No patient bullshit. 

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Thanks for the message! :)